Fair Trade Mag

Fair Trade Mag

About Fair Trade

About Fair TradeFair Trade focuses on requiring companies to pay prices at or above market price. Many large companies use their leverage to try to get goods at below market prices. This translates to lower living conditions, non living wages, and unfair trade in many developing countries. Fair trade is a general term of work done by the Fair Trade Foundation as well as the Fair Trade Labeling Organizations International. There are other groups around the world also working in this crucial area.

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What Fair Trade Is

What Fair Trade IsFair trade means a fair price for products. It does not mean that everyone who produces a product receives the same wage all around the world. It means a worker receives a price on their goods that allows them to make a decent living in their community. The prices cover the cost of production and enough profit to produce a living wage for the person and their family. It is not a charity give-away that offers something for nothing. The person must produce the goods as directed. They sell them to traders that pay them a fair trade price.

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Fair Trade Coffee

Fair Trade CoffeeAs one of the most recognizable products of fair trade, coffee has made strides into the marketplace. In 2005, the amount of coffee traded with fair trade practices amounted to less than one percent of the total world coffee trade. But that was almost a 70% increase of the amount produced in 2004. Growth continues each year going forward. With more people around the world becoming conscious of the effects of globalization on farmers and producers in developing nations, the growth will continue. There are many reasons why this will continue.

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Fair Trade Chocolate

Fair Trade ChocolateFair trade chocolate is an easy way for consumers to do their part. A good deal of the chocolate around the world comes from developing countries without any protections for workers. A big part of this comes out of African countries like Ghana, Cameroon, the Ivory Coast, and Nigeria. One way these countries get enough labor for the cocoa plantations, though, is through forced labor by children. Over 15,000 children in the northern part of the Ivory Coast work on the plantations after their parents or guardians sold them into slavery. Almost 300,000 children work on plantations in these African countries.

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Meaning of Fair Trade

Meaning of Fair TradeThe meaning of fair trade can vary according to which source you use. But the definition put forward by Oxfam and the Fairtrade Foundation is that it is an alternative approach to international trade. It is a partnership aimed at sustainable development for producers excluded from of or at a disadvantage in conventional trading channels. Those that help change these practices do this by raising awareness, campaigning, and promoting better trading options. There are other definitions of course. The basic meaning is making sure everyone in the chain from producer to consumer gets a fair deal as part of a product.

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Fair Trade Logo

Fair Trade LogoThe Fair Trade Logo is the mark of a product that meets the standards for fair trade set forward by the Fairtrade Labeling Organizations International. Another name for this group is FLO. The mark goes on products not the companies which produce them. There are strict regulations on who can use the label and how they can use it. The logo marks products which meet the fair trade practices of buyers paying a fair price for goods produced in developing countries. It provides the opportunity to individuals and small groups to get a sustainable wage and to improve their lives. The focus is on rebalancing the imbalances in power with conventional trading.

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Fair Trade Facts

Fair Trade FactsFair trade facts are a bit hard to argue. Most opponents to fair trade often site how fair trade practices interfere with the free market. But, there is more to life than money. Most people have no idea of just how exploitive many situations are around the world for individuals and families in many industries. Most cannot make a sustainable wage and many have huge loads of debt because they do not make enough money on which to live. Here is one fact 2.7 billion people live on less than $2 US per day. That is almost half the world’s population.

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Fair Trade Practices

Fair Trade PracticesFair trade boils down to promoting sustainable, fair price trading at all levels of business. Most efforts focus on individual or small group producers in third world countries. The practices of fair trade involve promoting living wages for workers in their local communities. In agricultural communities, food prices must meet a minimum regardless of what the rest of the world pays. The minimum insures that local farmers have the ability to make a decent living. Practices also look at the type of labor. Forced labor is not allowed and neither is exploitative child labor.

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Fair Trade Foundation

Fair Trade FoundationThe Fair Trade Foundation is a UK based charity working to fix the problems with conventional trading practices around the world. One of the most public parts of this organization is the Fairtrade mark it uses to label products produced under their regulations for fair trade. This same mark is also part of fair trade efforts in other countries as well. The Foundation came into existence in 1992 from the efforts of groups such as Christian Aid, OxFam, Traidcraft, and the World Development Movement. Other organizations joined the efforts soon after its founding.

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Department of Fair Trading

Department of Fair TradingFair trade chocolate is an easy way for consumers to do their part. A good deal of the chocolate around the world comes from developing countries without any protections for workers. A big part of this comes out of African countries like Ghana, Cameroon, the Ivory Coast, and Nigeria. One way these countries get enough labor for the cocoa plantations, though, is through forced labor by children. Over 15,000 children in the northern part of the Ivory Coast work on the plantations after their parents or guardians sold them into slavery. Almost 300,000 children work on plantations in these African countries.

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